Hummi-cam, A Raspberry Pi based Wildlife Camera with Telephoto Lens

A hummingbird decided to nest in our potted olive tree so, of course, I had to scour the web to see if I could make a wildlife camera using my favorite single-board computer, the $10 Raspberry Pi Zero W.

Sure enough, I found this guy’s webpage which had a fantastic idea of mating an inexpensive clip-on telephoto lens to a Raspberry Pi camera sensor.

The results were simply amazing! Ok, it’s definitly not National Geographic quality, and the photographers will whine about horrible chromatic aberration,  but it is damn awesome for a $12 lens hacked on to a $20 camera running on a $10 Linux computer with wifi in a $1.50 plastic teacup!

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Driving a nixie module with a Raspberry Pi

So a friend was poking around with these QS30-1 nixie modules from nixieclock.org and mentioned that he really wanted to use a Raspberry Pi to drive it instead of Arduino. The RPi is cheap (especially the Pi Zero and Zero W) and is much more capable than an Arduino (in most cases).

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Map a remote folder as a local drive via SFTP

Linux Mint and Ubuntu can open a remote folder natively in file manager using “File/Connect To Server…”, but many applications will not do this.

For example, you may want to use Geany IDE to edit Python files directly on your Raspberry Pi without having to copy back and forth over the network.

Here’s how to do it.

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Automount USB drives in Linux Mint via Command Line

There’s a desktop GUI to do this, but if you’re running headless, here’s how to do it via the command line. This udev script will automatically mount the removable drive as /media/label where label is the label of the drive.

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Run your own GitHub server using Gogs

There are several github servers you can run on your own machine, but Gogs is very lightweight and simple. So light that it will even run on a Raspberry Pi.

So if you just need basic github push, pull *AND* you want a web interface and markdown support, Gogs is the way to go.

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